Soccer//Public Health//Music//TV//Other Stuff

cursethecosmos:

whitecolonialism:

Images of the Border Crisis in the United States.
AATTP

An estimated 52,000 unaccompanied children have entered the United States from Central America since October. President Barack Obama has asked Congress for $3.7B to improve security along the border, provide better housing for the undocumented immigrants while in custody and to speed up the deportation process. 

Despite the horrible conditions these children are attempting to escape, conditions that include extreme poverty and violence, the White House has said that “they expect most will ultimately be repatriated,” despite the fact that about 60% of children coming over from Central America are eligible for some kind of humanitarian protection, according to a report from the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees.

While the problem before us must be handled immediately, it cannot be addressed without first examining it’s root causes. While our American elected officials and media would like to make us all believe that this issue is unrelated to American behavior and that it is simply the result of the inability of Central American countries such as El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras to protect their borders and reduce through policing their crime the truth is quite the opposite. This immigration issue that the United States is currently facing is the result of American economic and military intervention in Central America.

For decades the United States has toppled governments in Central America, fueled civil wars and most recently has escalated the War on Drugs within countries in Central America. The connection between the United States foreign policy and it’s current immigration problem cannot be ignored, every action has an effect and due to the actions taken by the United States in the past, we today see families from all over Central America attempt to flee the violence that the United States was instrumental in creating.

Spreading this like wildfire, because it needs to be seen. 

This is the abhorrent state of latinos/latinas in this country. We are treated as expendable, as cattle before anything else. Something’s gotta give. We matter goddammit. 

Stay woke. 

likelyhealthy:

Save The Women Not The Boobies

"This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.”

This is a great message - also, let’s not forget about trans men and non-binary folks who have not had top surgery and are more likely to delay mammography due to cissexism and transphobia within the medical system.

likelyhealthy:

Save The Women Not The Boobies

"This is honestly the best poster I have found in a while supporting breast cancer awareness. I am honestly so sick of seeing, “set the tatas free” and “save the boobies”. There is no reason in hell a life threatening, life ruining disease should be sexualized. “Don’t wear a bra day,” go fuck yourselves. You’re not saving a pair of tits, you’re saving the entire package: mind, body, and soul included. Women are not just a pair of breasts.”

This is a great message - also, let’s not forget about trans men and non-binary folks who have not had top surgery and are more likely to delay mammography due to cissexism and transphobia within the medical system.

“There is no ideal world for you to wait around for. The world is always just what it is now, and it’s up to you how you respond to it.”

Isaac MarionWarm Bodies (via creatingaquietmind)

nprglobalhealth:

3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse
Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.
"The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who’s in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.
She spent much of the next week caring for the family, along with dozens of other patients in the makeshift Ebola ward — a large white tent near a sloping hill outside the hospital. Each time she entered the unit, she would find Ibrahim in a different place.
"I [mostly found] him lying on the beds of other patients," she said. She wasn’t sure if he was lonely or confused, but she had trouble keeping him in his own bed. "So every time, I had to take him, give him a bath and dress him up and put him back [on his own mattress]," she said.
Meanwhile, Ibrahim’s mother’s health began to worsen. She began vomiting heavily and had severe diarrhea. Then, roughly seven days after the family had first arrived, she passed away. Ibrahim and his brothers were still alive in their beds, just a few feet away.
Continue reading.
Photo: After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse. (Anders Kelto/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse

Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.

"The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who’s in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.

She spent much of the next week caring for the family, along with dozens of other patients in the makeshift Ebola ward — a large white tent near a sloping hill outside the hospital. Each time she entered the unit, she would find Ibrahim in a different place.

"I [mostly found] him lying on the beds of other patients," she said. She wasn’t sure if he was lonely or confused, but she had trouble keeping him in his own bed. "So every time, I had to take him, give him a bath and dress him up and put him back [on his own mattress]," she said.

Meanwhile, Ibrahim’s mother’s health began to worsen. She began vomiting heavily and had severe diarrhea. Then, roughly seven days after the family had first arrived, she passed away. Ibrahim and his brothers were still alive in their beds, just a few feet away.

Continue reading.

Photo: After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse. (Anders Kelto/NPR)

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